As popularity of the Munson Heritage Festival continues to grow, festival committee chair Marshal Fuqua said there is still room for more heritage-themed vendors to participate in the two day event scheduled for October 10 and 11.

 As popularity of the Munson Heritage Festival continues to grow, festival committee chair Marshal Fuqua said there is still room for more heritage-themed vendors to participate in the two day event scheduled for October 10 and 11.

“(We had) about 7,800 last year,”  Fuqua said. “We grew about 2,500 for the year before. With the extra funds and resources with our advertising campaign this year..I am expecting we should get 10 to 12,000 people this year,” he said.

 Due to the festival’s previous success in growing attendance, the festival has also received assistance from the Santa Rosa County Tourism Development Council with more advertising.

Fuqua said the festival also brings in visitors from neighboring states like Alabama, Georgia, Tennessee and even Kentucky.

In addition to the many sponsors, which help make the festival possible, Fuqua is also appreciative of the many government agencies which assist with the festival, including the Florida Highway Patrol, Santa Rosa County Sheriff’s Office, Florida Forest Service and Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission.

Volunteers from other local organization including local churches, school clubs and nonprofits also help make the large festival happen by assisting with parking and collecting funds.

The festival committee thanks these organizations by allowing them to set a booth for free and allow them to raise funds for their particular cause. 

 Nearly 100 vendors have already registered to participate in the festival and only a few spot are left, Fuqua said.

“We want (vendors) to stick with the heritage of what the community is.”

The main draw to the event is allowing visitors to learn about how things were done in the past, from how cane syrup is made to learning how a grist mill operates or learning how to clean laundry using only a wash board, Fuqua said the displays will get different responses from the different generations that attend.

“For the older people, it brings back a lot of memories,” Fuqua said. “For the younger people, it’s an educational experience for them because they learn about things like milking cows or making wood shingles for the roof.”

This year, attendees will see how a water well operates and interacting with a chicken coop, where attendees will be able to feed  the chickens.

In addition to the numerous vendors for food and crafts, the event will also feature a live mix of country and bluegrass music throughout the event. The event will feature live gospel music.  

The occasion will also provide some competition for attendees through archery and black powder shooting competitions, the festival will also have a car show in which top placing awards will be rewarded. Games and activities will also be available for children throughout the event.