At Monday afternoon's council meeting (Aug. 5) the Milton City Council unveiled intentions to reroute log trucks driving through the city, hoping to increase public safety after a two log truck accidents occurred inside the city limits in recent weeks.



Councilman Grady Hester, Chairman of the Public Safety Committee said the council is in full support of finding alternate routes for log trucks. Rerouting the log trucks would protect the safety of citizens in the city, he said, but would require a coordinated effort with the county and state. The councilman stated he had been urging constituents to contact their county commissioners to voice their concerns regarding the subject.



"This will take the cooperation of three agencies," said Mayor Guy Thompson. "If we all three come together, I think we can say this is the route you're going to have to take."



The mayor said he has been speaking with county officials regarding changing the routes truckers take through the city. The roads truckers currently use are county-owned highways such as Berryhill Road. The Board of County Commissioners ultimately has the authority to dictate, or restrict, usage of a highway or road if it deems necessary.



"It is too dangerous to allow this to continue," Thompson said. "Within the next two months, we should be able to have something hammered out."



Milton Police Chief Greg Brand is tasked with pitching the plan to the county and the state. He said he is about to start negotiations with the county and the Florida Department of Transportation, attempting to keep the log trucks on safe routes.



Brand said ideally, he would like to keep the trucks on Highway 90, if not Interstate 10, to avoid the biggest issue---a "negative camber" turn at the intersection of Highway 90 and Dogwood Drive. Trucks make the turn, heading north onto Dogwood Drive en route to a popular route on Berryhill Road. When trucks are over-loaded, he said, they become top-heavy and have the potential to overturn, which could be dangerous.



Brand speculated the sharp turn, in conjunction with a yellow light and a heavy load caused the log-truck rollover accident that tied up traffic for hours in late June at Highway 90 and Dogwood Drive.